On Gatherings for Worship during the Present Coronavirus Crises – and Thoughts on the Doctrines of the Roman Catholic Church

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A government order was put out last week, banning all indoor gatherings of more than 100 people here in Ireland. I have been thinking particularly of places of worship in light of the present Coronavirus restrictions but I was especially interested to hear that Roman Catholic bishops have issued a directive prohibiting the gathering for mass anywhere, no matter how small the church. Who would ever have thought that such a thing could happen?
Small churches of other denominations have introduced measures such as no hand-shaking, no passing of “collection plates,” no hymn books and interaction with others reduced to a minimum, while larger churches are not meeting at all, with some having online services.
Reflections on the present surreal situation have led to others about certain denominations, but right now I am thinking of the Roman Catholic Church and its origins, as I have been reading a little leaflet which a friend lent to me recently: “Christianity and Romanism are Different” by Dr M. R. DeHann.
I was interested by the last section of the leaflet… and quote from it below. We would do well to remember that, as the leaflet states, the majority of the things taught by Rome are “NOWHERE TO BE FOUND IN THE BIBLE.”
“29 ADDITIONS TO GOD’S WORD”
The vast majority of the doctrines and beliefs of the Church of Rome have no basis whatsoever in the Bible. They were added at a later date contrary to the clear warning of the Bible in Revelation 22:18. Below is a list of unscriptural doctrines and the dates on which they were made official. All Roman Catholics are demanded to accept them without question.
1. The daily mass, adopted in 394 A.D.
2. The doctrine of purgatory (Pope Gregory), 593 A.D.
3. Prayers to the Virgin Queen of Heaven, 600 A.D.
4. The first Pope (Boniface III) 610 A.D.
5. Kissing the Pope’s foot began in 709 A.D.
6. Temporal power of the Pope declared in 750 A.D.
7. Worship of images, relics and cross 788 A.D.
8. Holy water, blessed by a priest, 850 A.D.
9. Veneration of St. Joseph began in 890 A.D.
10. Canonization of dead saints (Pope John XV) 995 A.D.
11. Lent and Good Friday began in 988 A.D.
12. The mass declared to be a sacrifice of Christ, 1050 A.D.
13. Celibacy of the priesthood and nuns, 1079 A.D.
14. The rosary introduced by Peter the Hermit, 1090 A.D.
15. Selling indulgences began in 1190 A.D.
16. Doctrine of transubstantiation adopted, 1215 A.D.
17. Confession of sins to human priest, 1215 A.D.
18. Adoration of the wafer (Pope Honorius), 1220 A.D.
19. Interpretation of the Bible forbidden to laity, 1229 A.D.
20. Scapular declared a charm against dangers, 1287 A.D.
21. Communion under one kind, 1414 A.D.
22. Seven sacraments declared, 1439 A.D.
23. Superstitions of the Ave Maria (Pope Sixtus V), 1508 A.D.
24. Tradition established as infallible authority, 1545 A.D.
25. Apocryphal books added to the Bible, 1546 A.D.
26. Immaculate Conception of the Virgin Mary, 1854 A.D.
27. Infallibility of the Popes, 1870 A.D.
28. Mary declared to be “Mother of God,” 1931 A.D.
29. Assumption (Translation) of Virgin Mary, 1950 A.D.
The tract continues… This is only a partial list of the things the Roman hierarchy has added to the Bible, and all of it without a shred of divine authority. If time permitted we could show that 75% of these traditions and dogmas accepted by the Roman Church are of pagan origin. This is even admitted by prominent Roman Catholics themselves. Cardinal Newman, one of the most respected authorities in the Roman Church, on page 359 of his book, “The Development of the Christian Religion,” states the following…
“Temples, incense, candles, votive offerings, holy water, holidays, and seasons of devotions, processions, blessing of fields, sacerdotal vestments, priests, monks and nuns, images… etc…. are all of pagan origin.”
At a time when many are alarmed by how swiftly this virus is moving through countries, perhaps it will also be a time of quiet reflection, interruption of old routines and healthy questioning for many. As the old saying goes… “It’s an ill wind that blows nobody good.” I pray that individuals all over this world will start to think on the value of their souls for whom the Lord Jesus Christ paid the ultimate price; be brought under conviction by the Holy Spirit and take stock of their lives in light of eternity.
Oh that many could see with the hymn writer (Elvina M. Hall 1865), that the Great Price has been paid. “And every priest standeth daily ministering and offering oftentimes the same sacrifices, which can never take away sins: But this man, after he had offered one sacrifice for sins for ever, sat down on the right hand of God;” (Hebrews 10v11&12)
“Jesus paid it all,
All to him I owe;
Sin had left a crimson stain,
He washed it white as snow.”
Link to this hymn: https://youtu.be/9bPaXN9j9yQ

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2 Responses to “On Gatherings for Worship during the Present Coronavirus Crises – and Thoughts on the Doctrines of the Roman Catholic Church”

  1. Cathy Says:

    I was born again over 30 years ago and I am still amazed and so very grateful that the Lord pulled me out of the darkness of Roman Catholicism. You can imagine how shocked I was when I realized so many churches and pastors here were embracing Rome.

    Regarding the coronavirus… here in the U.S we have been told that gatherings should be limited to 10 people. Grocery stores are lacking in certain products and there are several isles with totally empty shelves. Truly surreal.

  2. readywriterpublications Says:

    Cathy, it warms my heart to know how the Lord brought you out of that system and yes, the ecumenism of so called evangelicals is so disappointing, to say the least – and very disheartening for those young in the Lord. By the way… Max 10 people seems way more sensible than max 100 in this situation! We can only pray that wisdom will prevail and that the Lord will use it all to draw souls to Himself. I also continue to pray for your son, in every regard. May the Lord be with you and yours at this time.

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