Posts Tagged ‘communism’

Should Christians be Involved in Politics – or Even Vote?

March 9, 2011

After the recent general election and establishment of a new government in Ireland, I was thinking of those who don’t (or cannot) vote for one reason or another. However, few people realise that there is a substantial percentage of the population whose religious convictions prevent them from voting because of these words of Jesus: “My kingdom is not of this world.” (John 18v36) Yet I am also reminded of His words in Luke 20v25: “Render therefore unto Caesar the things which be Caesar’s, and unto God the things which be God’s.”

As I go about my business every day, I am very much aware that (like it or not) I actually live and participate in this world; a world where I buy and sell (for the moment) and a world of political leaders who make decisions which affect the nature of our lives as human beings. Could I, for example, as a Christian, stand by and take no part in a referendum which would introduce ethnic cleansing? If I had lived during the era of Hitler’s regime, would I not, as a Christian, have had strong views on this man’s murderous attitude to the Jews, God’s ancient chosen people – and to other minority groups whom he abhorred?

Yes, as an individual I feel morally bound to use my vote but to be honest I find myself voting to keep certain candidates out, as opposed to putting people into government.

Unfortunately in Ireland there are political parties which have been (and very possibly still are) associated with terrorist organisations. Therefore, how can I, as a Christian, stand back and not use the tiny influence that I have in my vote to stop such political parties gaining power in my country? In Proverbs 28v5 I read: “Evil men understand not judgement: but they that seek the Lord understand all things.” Therefore I feel that as a Christian the Lord would have me to use my vote prayerfully at both election and referendum times. However… should a Christian be a politician?

One good example of a Christian politician in history is William Wilberforce. This young man came to faith in the Lord Jesus Christ in 1784, having been influenced by a book “The Rise and Progress of Religion in the Soul” by William Doddridge who was a leading non-conformist in the early 18th century. It was the influence of William Wilberforce in politics which lead to the abolition of the slave trade but he also advocated many other changes in society which were based on Christian principles.

Having quoted this example of a Christian politician in history, however, I also believe that there are relatively few Christians involved in politics in today’s world, something which is evidenced by the introduction of evil laws and legislation which are contrary to scripture.

In answer to the question: “can a Christian be a politician?” I believe that the answer is ‘yes’ but only, of course, if the Lord definitely guides the individual to do so. He or she would need to be strong in their relationship with the Saviour and to be in no doubt as to their calling into this field for it is a difficult sphere in which to take a stand. Many snares are out there and the Christian must “dare to be a Daniel – and dare to make it known!” It must be remembered that neither politics nor any other issue in this life must get in the way of our relationship with the Lord. He must come first in our lives above all else and we must never be tempted to compromise our position because of popular or majority support for something which is contrary to God’s laws. Jesus said: “He that is not with me is against me;” (Matthew 12v30)

There can be no ‘sitting on the fence’ and no ‘grey areas’ when voting on any issue.

With this in mind it is interesting to note that William Wilberforce was an independent Member of Parliament. For obvious reasons, it is perhaps not a good idea for Christians to be involved in ‘Party Politics’ – unless the Party concerned has a manifesto which is based solely on Biblical principles.

As someone who was born in the middle of the 20th century I have watched, with interest, the political events of this world unfold. Totalitarian regimes and the many faces of communism have come and gone. Proverbs 1v14 warns of those who beg… “cast in thy lot among us; let us all have one purse;” and Proverbs 28v15 warns of wicked rulers… “As a roaring lion, and a raging bear; so is a wicked ruler over the poor people.”

Proverbs 27v24 declares… “For riches are not for ever: and doth the crown endure to every generation?” And so, this world will some day come to an end – along with all earthly kingdoms and political ideologies. But there is a King who is coming to reign and “of the increase of his government and peace there shall be no end…” (Isaiah 9v6&7) He is “KING OF KINGS, AND LORD OF LORDS” (Rev. 19v16) and His glorious Kingdom “is not of this world.” Therefore let us who know the Lord Jesus Christ as Saviour serve Him with a pure heart in this life, whatever our standing in the communities in which we live. We must take a stand on the controversial issues of our day, for if we claim to own Jesus as “King of Kings and Lord of Lords,” then we are the “salt of the earth” – but “if the salt have lost his savour, wherewith shall it be salted?” (Matthew 5v13)

Link to the hymn: “Sing we the King who is coming to reign:” http://www.hymntime.com/tch/htm/s/i/singking.htm

Church in Chains Conference – September 11th, 2010

September 9, 2010

Lord willing I hope to attend the annual Church in Chains Conference on Saturday September, 11th next in the Athlone Springs Hotel, County Westmeath in the Republic of Ireland. The special guest speaker this year will be Pastor Manuel Arias from Chiapas in Mexico who will tell of the long struggle for justice for a group of prisoners known as “The Innocent of Acteal.”

Church in Chains, an independent charity which is based in Ireland, encourages prayer and active support for persecuted Christians throughout the world. Evangelical Christians in particular appear to be targets for terrible forms of persecution, which persists in countries as diverse as Afghanistan, Egypt, Uzbekistan, Mexico, Turkey, Saudi Arabia, Eritrea, China, North Korea, Pakistan, Indonesia, Iran, and Iraq to name but a few.

As recently as July last, two Pastors (who were brothers) were shot dead outside a court in Faisalabad, Pakistan. These two young men (30 and 32) were being led in handcuffs back to the jail when the murder occurred. Their crime…? Attempting to spread the gospel, for which they were facing blasphemy charges.

How thankful I am to live in a country where I am free to worship the Saviour, to seek Him in prayer, to read His Word and to tell others of His love. But I am ever aware that the devil is active and that some day even in my own country there may arise those in high places who oppose the liberty that Christians currently enjoy.

Jesus said: “And fear not them which kill the body, but are not able to kill the soul: but rather fear him which is able to destroy both soul and body in hell.” (Matthew 10v28)

We live in dangerous days, when the evil one is igniting the fires of hatred amongst those who are actively opposing the gospel and who hate the very name of Jesus. To Christians who read: please pray for brothers and sisters all across the world who are facing isolation; who are ostracised by their families; who are imprisoned for their faith and who may be facing torture and death. You may not know them all by name but the Holy Spirit will assist your prayer… “Likewise the Spirit also helpeth our infirmities: for we know not what we should pray for as we ought: but the Spirit itself maketh intercession for us with groanings which cannot be uttered.” (Romans 8v26)

I have discovered, nevertheless, that not everyone who attends this particular conference is a Christian, even though they may find it of interest and are not antagonistic. For this reason it is good to be led of the Spirit in conversations with those we meet and to look for opportunities to witness.

My books: “A Biblical Journey through the Irish Year, Singing on the Journey Home and the children’s book: “God Made You, God Loves You, God Saves You” will be available there, along with handcrafted scripture bookmarks – which are free with the books. With regard to the latter, my prayer as always, is that the Lord would use the words He has given me to touch hearts, whatever their spiritual needs might be.

My Recent Visit to Albania

August 21, 2010

Albania… In the 1970’s the very mention of its name conjured up images in my mind of a forsaken, mysterious land where worship of God was forbidden. I am old enough to remember Albania as it was during that dark era when it was declared an atheist state, the first of its kind in the world. This was the era of Enver Hoxha’s regime and this was an era when tourists were not normally welcomed to Albania’s shores, perhaps because of the influence that they might have had. I remember reading about the experience of one traveller back then who somehow managed to get across the border, only to be confronted with a cold sign in a railway station which simply read: “There is no God.”

This immediately brings to mind the words of Psalm 14v1… “The fool hath said in his heart, There is no God…” How marvellous that dictatorships and regimes may come and go upon this earth – “but the word of the Lord endureth forever.” (1Pet. 1v25) And His Spirit is not subject to the will and restraining influences of mankind!

This summer I was delighted to have the opportunity to visit Albania for the very first time. At the first faint view of its shores across the sparkling sea, I smiled with delight. After all these years of wishing for the opportunity, at last my dream had come true! As our ferry approached the Port of Sarandё, I took in the pastel-coloured apartments and a lovely stretch of sandy beach with parasols, where Albanians were sunbathing.

Once we had boarded the coach which would take us to the archaeological centre of Butrint, however, I could see clearly that here was a country in transition. Our Albanian guide apologised for the state of the unsurfaced road… “The government said it would be finished in June,” he said, and then added jokingly… “but they didn’t say which year!” And so, after a rough sea journey, I was again feeling a little ‘on the wobbly side,’ as the coach dipped up and down through potholes and giant craters on the unsurfaced roads. At one point I noticed the strange sight of a lone bullock with a bell around its neck walking ahead of us on the terrible road. ‘Poor thing,’ I thought as I observed the bones protruding from its back. Strangely there were many half-erected dwelling places en route, which looked like the ‘leaning tower of Pisa.’ “They’ve been asked to pull those down again,” explained the guide, “they didn’t really have permission.” My fellow travellers nodded silently and raised their eyebrows.

On our arrival at the beautiful area of Butrint, I admired the nearby lake, where a lone fisherman sat in his boat. I loved the atmosphere of this historical place which reminded me, in a sense of my own native Ireland. As we descended from the coach little children ran to us with lovely handmade colourful bracelets at €1 each, while hanging from the branches of nearby trees were more handcrafted articles for sale. The archaeological area of Butrint, our guide told us, was inhabited in prehistoric times and there was once Roman colony there. As we followed him around this place where history had left its indelible mark, I thought about the Roman Empire and the Apostle Paul… Hadn’t my recent reading in Romans 15 shown how Paul had preached the gospel from Jerusalem to Illyricum and hadn’t I discovered that Illyricum was in ancient Albania?

We returned from the archaeological centre along the rocky road where a pleasant meal was waiting for us in a hotel in Sarandё and then we had just a short time of freedom to explore some of the nearby streets. I had so many of my free handcrafted bookmarks (with John 3v16 inserted in Albanian) to give out – and so little time to do it! It was rewarding, that particular experience, and I will never forget the gratitude (for the most part) of those who received them.

I would ask prayer for the souls of Albania, which today consists of 70% Muslim, 20% Albanian Orthodox, a small number of Roman Catholics – and an even smaller number of Evangelical Christians. May Albania’s men, women and lovely little children awake to the good news that the Lord Jesus Christ has come to give them life – and life that is more abundant! (John 10v10)