Posts Tagged ‘genealogy’

When My Father and My Mother Forsake Me, Then the Lord Will Take Me Up (Psalm 27v10)

January 16, 2019

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Just recently I have been reading about the experience of a lady who had been adopted and in later life had a yearning to find her biological parents. I believe that most people have this natural curiosity to discover who their birth parents are; she also had some health issues and wanted to know whether these were hereditary. This led to an initial contact with grandparents, who were delighted to hear from her – and later also with two brothers who were also initially glad to know about her. She discovered from her grandparents that her own parents later had married – which seemed wonderful and the best possible scenario. She now felt that she could contact her real mother and father who would be as welcoming as the rest of the family and be overjoyed to meet their only daughter.

Sadly this was not to be… they rejected her and wanted no contact whatsoever. Even her grandparents could not understand their attitude but both they and her brothers appeared to be strongly influenced by the reaction of the parents and in time made it clear that they had no wish for any further contact. The mother who had adopted her, loved her and raised her had also recently died, which distressed her terribly. Apart from her loving adoptive mother’s death, she said that this “second rejection,” as she saw it, was devastating for her.

Such stories are not unusual. This one is not set in my country but I have recently heard of many other similar stories here in Ireland where mothers have no wish to ever see or be in contact with the child that they gave birth to. On the other hand, there are many more stories of joyful reunions; these were often situations where mothers did not want to give up their children but were forced to do so by the prevailing power of the Roman Catholic system at the time. Such mothers were heartbroken when their babies were snatched away to be trafficked for adoption, with R.C. organisations being paid for the adoption. Indeed, many mothers searched for years for their children, some sadly dying, without ever having met them.

Nevertheless there are other stories which have come to my attention recently and these, although truly heart breaking from an initial glance, are surrounded by great hope, faith, blessing and victory. These are the stories of people, who having come to know the Lord Jesus Christ as Saviour, are totally abandoned by family, friends and loved ones. But these souls look to the Lord for their every breath – He is more than life itself to them. They continue to love and pray for those who have rejected them even though in some instances their lives are in danger, if for example, they have left a system of belief such as Islam.

Jesus said: “And every one that hath forsaken houses, or brethren, or sisters, or father, or mother, or wife, or children, or lands, for my sake, shall receive an hundredfold, and shall inherit eternal life.” (Matthew 19v29) Of course, this must be read in context. The Lord never expected anyone to abandon their children, or indeed a husband or wife if they are already married but often those who are called into certain service for Him, are led to remain unmarried and without children and so they forsake that way of life for Him. And as regards material property, we of course hand this to the Lord, for Him to use as He sees fit.  There is also a sense in which, when we are wholly following the Lord, our lives being guided in the way that He would have us go, that we will be forsaken of everything that the world holds dear and unfortunately we may also be forsaken by once good friends, loved ones or even spouses and older children.

“Can a mother forget her sucking child, that she should not have compassion on the son of her womb? Yea, they may forget, yet will I not forget thee.” (Isaiah 49v15)

What is your situation today? Do you feel that you have been denied by the very people who are responsible for your existence in this world? Well, there is Someone who loved you enough to die for you, even before you were ever born. Why not confess your sins (for we all have sinned) to the Lord Jesus Christ alone and put your trust in Him as Lord and Saviour? Believe me, you will find the greatest Friend for now and for eternity. He knows you, He loves you and your happiness and well-being in this life and the next… is His goal. “Behold, I have graven thee upon the palms of my hands; thy walls are continually before me.” (Isaiah 49v16)

Do you feel abandoned today, or ridiculed because you have chosen to follow the Lord Jesus Christ as Saviour? Or could it be that you even feel in danger because you no longer want to be a part of something which you know is wrong? There is nothing in your life that the Lord Jesus Christ is not aware of – whoever you are or wherever you are. Remember that your times are in His hands and He will take care of every detail of your life, if you have committed it into His care.

Perhaps, on the other hand, you have had a loving family upbringing but still you may not know the Lord Jesus Christ as Saviour. Life, even for those of us who have a good start in it, can be stormy to say the least. Why would you want to face those storms alone, without the power of the One who loved you and gave Himself for you? With this Captain at the helm – you can be certain of victory!

Always remember that He will reward you “an hundredfold” and you shall “inherit everlasting life” (Matthew 19v29) in the Presence of Someone who loved you so much that He gave His life for you, when you trust in Him as Lord and Saviour.

Whether you have forsaken material possessions for His sake, or whether those you love have forsaken you, there is indeed “a Friend that sticketh closer than a brother.” (Proverbs 18v24)

May the Lord bless you and meet you at the point of your need.

 

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As Time Goes By We Look At Our Roots…

January 15, 2018

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We inherit so much from our forefathers; everything from physical characteristics and mannerisms – to the genes which have an influence on our physical and even mental health. I believe that as we grow older, most of us are fascinated by the lives of our forefathers and when parents pass away, it is comforting to see some resemblance of them in our children.

Above is a photograph of my paternal grandmother who was born in New York in 1892 but returned with her parents to their native Ireland some years later. When I look in the mirror I sometimes see my father and at other times, my mother looking back at me and I smile in the knowledge that they have gone to a far better place where inherited diseases of the human race are no more. It is interesting to know why I look a certain way but it’s also good to know that I may be susceptible to certain problems with age – such as the glaucoma which my father inherited. Hereditary problems are something which can be prepared for, managed or even prevented when we have knowledge of them.

I have often wondered how it would feel to have been adopted, without any knowledge of who my parents were. If we have no idea who our parents are (or who even one of our parents is) it can leave a great void in life but it can also be a problem from a health point of view. I feel that if I had been adopted, I would really want to know my parents and yet I also know (from the experiences of friends) that such a meeting could possibly be a fiasco, at best. We have all known of emotional reunions between mothers or fathers and their children which have been a great success. We see two people running in slow motion towards each other. They talk non-stop and catch up on all the lost years between them, finding so much in common – and then they become friends for life. Often, however, in reality this is not the case.

I recently read of a lady who had been brought up by her mother, a single parent. She was anxious to meet her father but her mother seemed reluctant for this to happen – possibly because she wanted to protect her daughter from the inevitable hurt she knew would ensue. Eventually this young lady met her father, who to her shock was a priest in the Roman Catholic Church – and to her hurt was very secretive about their meeting. The last thing he wanted on earth was for there to be knowledge of this daughter and so, although he met her, he really wanted nothing to do with her. There is, in fact, now an organisation/support group for the many children of R.C. priests who are in this hurtful situation in which they may have been supported financially – but not emotionally.

In the era in which we live, the traditional family unit is under attack and there are really complex situations going on where people have no idea who one or even both of their parents are. Researching a family tree, as time goes on, may well become an impossible feat for many people. I have heard, too, of other terrible situations where someone discovers to their horror that they are dating “a half brother or sister” that they had no knowledge of.

As I read and take notes through the Book of Genesis once more, I also see that it was always God’s will for the family to be defined as one husband, one wife – and their family. Despite modern day philosophy and also some cults claiming otherwise, it was never in God’s will for a husband to take concubines and more than one wife or for a family unit to consist of two “husbands” or two “wives.”

Because something is recorded as an historical event or common practice in the Old Testament did not make it right in God’s eyes. “Therefore shall a man leave his father and his mother, and shall cleave unto his wife: and they shall be one flesh.” (Genesis 2v24) Jesus also echoes these words in Matthew 19v5.  I recall feeling sorry for Hagar, as she was the unfortunate victim initially when Sarah and Abraham didn’t wait for the Lord’s timing. But God took care of Hagar and her son, when she felt that there was no hope for either of them. “And God opened her eyes, and she saw a well of water; and she went, and filled the bottle with water, and gave the lad drink.” (Genesis 21v19)

Isaac, the son of promise, is the distant earthly forefather of our Lord Jesus Christ – who, praise God, is the answer to all of mankind’s sin and problems. Society has evolved into something undesirable in His eyes, “just as in the days of Noah…”  Yet, in this the Day of Grace, He still stands with arms outstretched to the “whosever” that “shall call on the name of the Lord” and they “shall be delivered.” (Joel 2v32) He came to set us free from sin, death, hell and the snares of this life. He came that we would have life and have it more abundantly and His will is for us to know and love His Word which teaches us how to live.

In much of society it is now considered offensive to quote God’s Word with regard to the great moral dilemmas of our age but do we choose to be silent about the world’s wrongful philosophies or do we uphold the teachings of God’s Word? Like Moses, today’s people of the Lord are “choosing rather to suffer affliction with the people of God, than to enjoy the pleasures of sin for a season; Esteeming the reproach of Christ greater riches than the treasures of Egypt: for he had respect unto the recompence of the reward.” (Hebrews 11v25&26) Like Moses, by faith we must forsake Egypt!

As I read my Bible these days, absorbing how it was from the early days of creation, to Noah and the flood and then on to Abraham and the generations after him, I feel the Lord saying to me continually that “with God all things are possible.” (Matthew 19v26) Faith is the victory that overcomes the world! “For whosoever is born of God overcometh the world: and this is the victory that overcometh the world, even our faith.” (1John 5v4)

The faith of a multitude of Old Testament characters is portrayed in Hebrews 11 and it is faith that has made men and women triumph over adversity throughout the ages. Yes, there is no situation too impossible or too complicated for the Lord to deal with and put right. Whatever our background, our inherited problems or the complications of our family history or situation, there is nothing too hard for the Lord, if we but give Him our all and trust Him to save us to the uttermost.

“Is anything too hard for the Lord?” (Genesis 18v14) Praise God, those who put their trust in Him look… “for an inheritance incorruptible, and undefiled, and that fadeth not away” (1Peter 1v4) and “for a city which hath foundations, whose builder and maker is God.” (Hebrews 11v10)

 

 

On Genealogy – and a Spiritual Inheritance

May 23, 2011

It must have been a nostalgic moment for President Obama when he first encountered the little Irish village of Moneygall in County Offaly, from where his great-great-great grandfather emigrated in 1850. I had similar feelings when I first visited the tiny cottage on the shores of Lough Neagh, where my great-grandmother gave birth to ten children. Not all of those children lived into adulthood and of those who survived, many emigrated to the U.S.A, because of the economic circumstances of the time. I often wonder are there any descendants of those children still alive today… Photographs of my ancestors were passed on to me by an elderly relative – and a wedding ring belonging to that same great-grandmother who had the ten children. To this day I wear it, this precious heirloom… and I will pass it on to my eldest daughter.

I often daydream about the life of my hard-working great-grandmother (Mrs. Elizabeth Turkington) who lived under such humble circumstances. But where are they today, the descendants of those daughters who emigrated in the nineteenth century? Sometimes I take the well-worn ring off, hold it in the palm of my hand and dream of how it must have been for her all those years ago…

Someday, when I get the time, I hope to delve into old church records pertaining to my ancestors in that area. Perhaps after much research I may even find at least one descendant from that original family who is still alive! I believe that as we grow older, that yearning to find our ancestral roots grows more intense and yet I know that for those who belong to the Lord, it is more important by far to reach our living relations with the gospel of our Lord Jesus Christ.

The years pass for us all, with their joys and sorrows, just as it did for our ancestors from long ago. One generation follows another quite quickly and a few generations later we will be forgotten of those who still live on the earth. Still, I believe that Christian writers who live in this age can leave an inheritance of spiritual significance, for the words that we write can live on to challenge, convict and encourage.

I would therefore encourage those who have a sincere desire to reach out to souls – to keep writing to the glory of their Lord and Saviour. Yes, there will be discouragements and there will be those who misunderstand or even mock your efforts – but your writings can survive the rolling years, inspiring others long after you have been taken Home.

Antique heirlooms and photographs may be beautiful possessions – but how wonderful to know that the Christian’s writings can survive to reach future generations with the truth and love that has been gleaned from God’s precious Word. “My heart is inditing a good matter: I speak of the things which I have made touching the King: my tongue is the pen of a ready writer.” (Psalm 45v1)

The Significance of Names – & a Beacon on the Hill

September 13, 2010

Very recently some members of my family in Northern Ireland decided to commemorate the 400th anniversary of their arrival in Ireland. It must be said that the Plantation of Ulster can be a divisive and sensitive subject on which to dwell and so I will not do so. However, the Lord has led me to look at it from a spiritual point of view, using the occasion to reach many with the truth of His Word. Here is a tiny bit about the history…

My surname before I was married was “Hutchinson;” John Hutchinson and his son William were the first to arrive from Staffordshire in England, in 1610, to the area of Mullaghbane, just outside the city of Armagh. William had a son called Andrew, known in later life as “old Andrew.” The latter had a son called Samuel who in turn had a son called Andrew… and so on…! Of course I realize that only those with an interest in (or a connection with) the Hutchinsons from this area of County Armagh would be interested in the entire family tree! By the way, should someone who is reading this require the information, please feel free to contact me.

The event was to be celebrated with a large bonfire on a high hill, somehow reminding me of the “warning beacons” which were lit in Elizabethan times to warn of the coming Spanish Armada. As I thought about the forthcoming glow of the great fire, all sorts of thoughts were going though my head… the preservation of family names through the ages; the handing down of land from one generation to another; old wars and disputed territory; the origin and meaning of our names; and the fascinating gene pool that makes us the individuals we are today, with all our personality traits and physical appearance. Clearly we are very much victims of circumstance, having no control over our origins.

“You’re not related to Burke (Hare’s body snatching accomplice), are you?” I have been jokingly asked, to which I vehemently deny that I have any connection. “Oh no,” I say, “I’m married to a Burke.” Then I think, ‘well, really you know, we are all related from Adam and Eve, so in the great view of the origins of mankind – then, yes, I am related to everyone, including those infamous characters in history.’ So – what is in a name? In this part of the world surnames were often derived from the trade that a person was engaged in, e.g. ‘Thatcher,’ ‘Butler,’ or ‘Farmer,’ or from the area that the family came from, e.g. Moore, Marsh or Woods, or the names of cities or towns; while ‘good’ and ‘bad’ names alike have a certain history associated with them. In the Celtic realm, ‘Mac’ and ‘O’ preceding a name means ‘son of.’ The Bible tells us that “a good name is rather to be chosen than great riches, and loving favour rather than silver and gold.” (Prov.22v1) A good name and reputation can take a lifetime to establish – but a good name can also be tarnished within a very short time indeed.

Names are very significant in many societies throughout the world, revealing everything from the origin of the person to his political standing and perhaps even his class or caste. In this life there are great, and often unjust, divisions between the classes in some societies but how is this all viewed in the light of eternity?

Some day we will stand before the Judge of all mankind, devoid of all the trappings of this life because God is no respecter of persons. We cannot present Him with our respectable family name and although we may have worked hard all our lives, we cannot come to Him with our diligence. We may be viewed as a “pillar of society” but this means nothing to Him, while our affluence and education (or lack of these) is also irrelevant to Him. No, when I stand before God, I will be judged on what I have done with the Name that is above every Name, (Phil. 2v9): the Name of the precious Lord Jesus Christ. “That at the name of Jesus every knee should bow, of things in heaven, and things in earth, and things under the earth; And that every tongue should confess that Jesus Christ is Lord, to the glory of God the Father.” (Phil. 2v10&11)

For those who did not acknowledge Him as Saviour in this life, nor recognized that “here we have no continuing city” (Heb.13v14) it will be too late. The Bible speaks of those whose “inward thought is, that their houses shall continue for ever, and their dwelling places to all generations; they call their lands after their own names.” (Psalm 49v11) But the day will surely come when this entire earth (and all our lands and possessions) will be no more. “For, behold, I create new heavens and a new earth and the former shall not be remembered, nor come into mind.” (Isaiah 65v17)

Therefore, in the light of these great truths, we must be sure that we are right with God. Is your name written in the Lamb’s Book of Life? We cannot be responsible for the decisions and lives of our forebearers – but God has given to each one of us the opportunity to get right with Him in this life. Praise God, if you do so, you will be given a new name in Heaven. (Rev. 3v12)

If you have trusted in that Name that is above every name, remember His words in Revelation 3v11: “Behold I come quickly: hold that fast which thou hast, that no man take thy crown.” When I thought about the great bonfire on the hill, I was reminded of these words: “Ye are the light of the world. A city that is set on an hill cannot be hid.” (Matthew 5v14) Like the great beacons on the hills in bygone days which burned brightly to warn of the advancing danger of the Spanish Armada, the Christian’s life must burn brightly for the Lord Jesus Christ who is returning again to judge the world. “Let your light so shine before men, that they may see your good works, and glorify your Father which is in heaven.” (Matthew 5v16)

Have you never trusted Him as Saviour? Remember that eternity lies before you. Which will it be – an eternity of intense pain and great darkness, with no comforting Presence of the Saviour – or a joyful eternity in Heaven with the Lord and all who love Him? The latter is God’s will for you, whoever you are! Repent of your sin; ask Him to forgive you for all that previous life lived outside His Presence and ask Him to come into your life and make you a new person, for he has said: “Him that cometh unto me, I will in no wise cast out.” (John 6v37) Only trust Him now in the quietness of your heart.

Yes, “a good name is rather to be had than silver or gold,” but only God can give us a good (and a new) name that counts for eternity, when we trust in the Name of the Lord Jesus Christ by faith, for salvation.

I love Charles Austin Miles’ hymn: “A New Name in Glory.” May yours be one of those names today!

Link to this hymn: http://www.cyberhymnal.org/htm/n/e/newnamei.htm