Posts Tagged ‘royal ulster constabulary’

The Saving and Keeping Power – the Testimony of Inspector Brian Martin (1955-1983)

October 27, 2019

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Inside an old book one day, I found the following little testimony tract written by John Brian Martin, a young police inspector, prior to his death in the Northern Ireland troubles. Having visited Banbridge just recently, I discovered on research that this was the town in which Brian lived with his wife and two young children prior to his death. He was murdered just before his 28th birthday, along with other young officers who were attending a lecture in the Ulster Polytechnic in Jordanstown; these sadly died later. Reading this information made me aware of the brevity of life and how we must be ready to meet the Lord. The following was written in the introduction…
JOHN BRIAN MARTIN, a Police Inspector in the Royal Ulster Constabulary died as the result of a terrorist bomb at the Ulster Polytechnic whilst attending as a student on 4th November 1983. Prior to his death he committed to print his testimony of the “Saving and Keeping Power” in his life which is told as follows…
“The Lord brought me into the world on the 4th December 1955 and the earliest recollection I have is when I was very small and my father getting down on his knees with me at night before I went to bed and reciting the Lord’s Prayer to me until I was able to say it as well. I was the eldest in a family of three, having two younger sisters. I was not raised in a Christian home but in “a church home,” if I could use that phrase. It was seen to that I was taken to Sunday school and church every Sunday and was even encouraged to do scripture exams. Then, when I was 11 years old, my father died. This had a profound effect on me at the time, as I was the eldest in the family. To my mother’s credit, she saw to it that I still attended Sunday school, church and the Youth Club.
At 18 I joined the Police and it was while training at Enniskillen that I first came into contact with the Christian Police Association, as they distributed a copy of the New Testament to each recruit. Back then I had more concern for the things of the world than my own soul; cars and having a good time were all I was concerned about.
I was by no means a drunkard but drink to me then seemed to be the “in thing” socially as it appeared to have some sort of status attached to it. I continued in this vein of life and then got married. Just before I got married my wife became a Christian. She told me at the time and I can remember thinking distastefully about her decision. Now I can see that this was part of God’s plan for me. I went to church as regularly as possible, was a choir member, a committee member and even went along with my wife to the mid-week Bible study and prayer meeting. I had the outward appearance of being a Christian but still I knew I had not made the commitment that was required.
I went to various missions and gospel halls with my wife and at the beginning of 1980 I knew the Lord was talking to me. I was confused and restless and feeling extremely agitated. My wife and her mother, both committed Christians, I knew were praying for my salvation. I knew within myself what I had to do but pride in myself was keeping me from doing so.
Finally, on 18th May, 1981, after attending a gospel service in Rathfriland the previous evening, I committed my life to the Lord. I went to see my own minister that day, seeking for salvation, counsel and guidance. I felt very humbled in this but the Lord gave me courage to do it. I spent a gratifying time with my minister that morning and after making a simple prayer with him and commitment, I felt all the unrest and unease begin to lessen. We both spent a time of fellowship together and when I went to work that evening I told a colleague (who I knew was a committed Christian) of my experience, which helped me in my stand. At that moment I was at peace within myself and had an assurance which I never had before. I wondered how I might tell some of my non-Christian friends. This was made easy for me with the Lord’s help. I can say in all honesty that to lead a Christian life, especially in the Police Force, is not an easy one. It is a battlefield all the way, but although not an easy life, it is a blessed life. If you dear friend, are holding back from commitment to the Lord because of your own pride, as was my case, I would say to you, act now before it is too late. In Genesis 6v3 it says that the Lord’s Spirit shall not always strive with man. This indeed is a sobering thought. If you feel that the Lord is talking to you and you are under conviction, I would urge you to act; the Christian life, as I have found every day, brings a new challenge, a new experience and new friends.”
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A short time after writing this, and only two years after committing his life to the Lord, this young man lost his life on this earth because of the forces of evil in those days. But praise God “if we believe that Jesus died and rose again, even so them also which sleep in Jesus will God bring with him.” (1Thessaonians 4v14).
I pray that someone somewhere will still be touched by his story, for the Lord loves you and it is not His will that you should go out into a lost eternity – whatever part you played in Ireland’s conflict, or indeed whoever, or wherever you are in this world…