Posts Tagged ‘st. paul’

Reflecting on the words of Paul on the Greek island of Rhodes

August 13, 2013

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Some time ago I made a brief visit to the Greek island of Rhodes, famed for its beautiful butterfly valley, its rich history, historical sites and ‘St. Paul’s Bay.’

Above is an early morning view from my little balcony in the quiet village of Haraki (Charaki) which lies just north of Lindos in Rhodes. Lindos was founded around the 10th century BC and overlooks that bay which is reportedly the location where Paul landed all those years ago. “And it came to pass, that after we had gotten from them, and launched, we came with a straight course unto Co-os (Kos), and the day following unto Rhodes, and from thence to Pat-a-ra.” (Acts 21v1)

“Them…” who were they? We read that Paul’s fellow Christians “all wept sore, and fell on Paul’s neck, and kissed him, sorrowing most of all for the words which he spake, that they should see his face no more. And they accompanied him unto the ship.”

How rare it is in these days to witness sincerity, concern and genuine love expressed as it was amongst the early Christians.

In this “crooked and perverse” world we live in, Christians are appalled at the behaviour of those around them who have no love or care in their hearts for even close relatives. But is it possible that even those who declare themselves to be Christians fall short in this?

 I think on Paul’s words in Philippians 2v5-8 … “Let this mind be in you which was also in Christ Jesus: Who being in the form of God, thought it not robbery to be equal with God: But made himself of no reputation, and took upon him the form of a servant, and was made in the likeness of men: And being found in fashion as a man, he humbled himself, and became obedient unto death, even the death of a cross…”

Therefore we are exhorted to “let this mind be in us which was also in Christ Jesus.”

And to “do all things without murmurings and disputings: that ye may be blameless and harmless, the sons of God, without rebuke, in the midst of a crooked and perverse nation, among whom ye shine as lights in the world.” (Phil. 2v14-15)

If these lights grow dim – what hope is there for the rest of this perverse world in which we live?

Yes, it is often difficult. We will most certainly face persecution, opposition and false accusations as we “press toward the mark of the prize of the high calling of God in Christ Jesus.” (Phil. 3v14)

But we have these promises if we press forward in His strength… “the peace of God, which passeth all understanding, shall keep your hearts and minds through Christ Jesus” (Phil. 4v7); “I can do all things through Christ which strengtheneth me,” (Phil. 4v13); “my God shall supply all your need according to his riches in glory by Christ Jesus.” (Phil. 4v19); “But the Lord is faithful, who shall stablish you, and keep you from evil.” (2Thess. 3v3)

As the same fierce sun sets once again across the same beautiful rolling tide that washed Paul’s ship into the little bay of Lindos, I know that the same Saviour who loved His servant Paul, loves us with an everlasting love and desires the very best for each one of us, that we may be used of Him to shine as lights in the darkest of waters.

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My Recent Visit to Albania

August 21, 2010

Albania… In the 1970’s the very mention of its name conjured up images in my mind of a forsaken, mysterious land where worship of God was forbidden. I am old enough to remember Albania as it was during that dark era when it was declared an atheist state, the first of its kind in the world. This was the era of Enver Hoxha’s regime and this was an era when tourists were not normally welcomed to Albania’s shores, perhaps because of the influence that they might have had. I remember reading about the experience of one traveller back then who somehow managed to get across the border, only to be confronted with a cold sign in a railway station which simply read: “There is no God.”

This immediately brings to mind the words of Psalm 14v1… “The fool hath said in his heart, There is no God…” How marvellous that dictatorships and regimes may come and go upon this earth – “but the word of the Lord endureth forever.” (1Pet. 1v25) And His Spirit is not subject to the will and restraining influences of mankind!

This summer I was delighted to have the opportunity to visit Albania for the very first time. At the first faint view of its shores across the sparkling sea, I smiled with delight. After all these years of wishing for the opportunity, at last my dream had come true! As our ferry approached the Port of Sarandё, I took in the pastel-coloured apartments and a lovely stretch of sandy beach with parasols, where Albanians were sunbathing.

Once we had boarded the coach which would take us to the archaeological centre of Butrint, however, I could see clearly that here was a country in transition. Our Albanian guide apologised for the state of the unsurfaced road… “The government said it would be finished in June,” he said, and then added jokingly… “but they didn’t say which year!” And so, after a rough sea journey, I was again feeling a little ‘on the wobbly side,’ as the coach dipped up and down through potholes and giant craters on the unsurfaced roads. At one point I noticed the strange sight of a lone bullock with a bell around its neck walking ahead of us on the terrible road. ‘Poor thing,’ I thought as I observed the bones protruding from its back. Strangely there were many half-erected dwelling places en route, which looked like the ‘leaning tower of Pisa.’ “They’ve been asked to pull those down again,” explained the guide, “they didn’t really have permission.” My fellow travellers nodded silently and raised their eyebrows.

On our arrival at the beautiful area of Butrint, I admired the nearby lake, where a lone fisherman sat in his boat. I loved the atmosphere of this historical place which reminded me, in a sense of my own native Ireland. As we descended from the coach little children ran to us with lovely handmade colourful bracelets at €1 each, while hanging from the branches of nearby trees were more handcrafted articles for sale. The archaeological area of Butrint, our guide told us, was inhabited in prehistoric times and there was once Roman colony there. As we followed him around this place where history had left its indelible mark, I thought about the Roman Empire and the Apostle Paul… Hadn’t my recent reading in Romans 15 shown how Paul had preached the gospel from Jerusalem to Illyricum and hadn’t I discovered that Illyricum was in ancient Albania?

We returned from the archaeological centre along the rocky road where a pleasant meal was waiting for us in a hotel in Sarandё and then we had just a short time of freedom to explore some of the nearby streets. I had so many of my free handcrafted bookmarks (with John 3v16 inserted in Albanian) to give out – and so little time to do it! It was rewarding, that particular experience, and I will never forget the gratitude (for the most part) of those who received them.

I would ask prayer for the souls of Albania, which today consists of 70% Muslim, 20% Albanian Orthodox, a small number of Roman Catholics – and an even smaller number of Evangelical Christians. May Albania’s men, women and lovely little children awake to the good news that the Lord Jesus Christ has come to give them life – and life that is more abundant! (John 10v10) 

The Lovely Greek Island of Corfu

August 9, 2010

It is true that Corfu became the first Greek island to be introduced to tourism in a big way but today it is still possible to find a secluded beach, or a quiet little village unspoilt by time. “Come ye apart and rest awhile” Jesus said to His disciples and today, as then, sometimes as Christians we need to draw apart and rest awhile. Yet even in our resting moments, we are still His ambassadors, ever showing our love for the souls who briefly touch our lives. I have always enjoyed trips to Greece and its islands, having a special affinity with the Greek people and would have to say that I have been impressed, for the most part, by their honesty and integrity as a nation.

Once when I was very young and travelling alone with a rucksack on my back across mainland Greece, I became ill from sunstroke. I don’t remember how I came to be in a dark room, lying on a bed of clean cool linen sheets, or how I had came into contact with the old lady who carried me glasses of cold fresh water and looked after me. The curtains were drawn for what seemed like days; I had lost all count of time. I only recall feeling extremely sick and thirsty and having no wish to even look at the sun for a very long time. As I lay there in the darkness, she hovered around anxiously trying to communicate with me, although she spoke no English and my knowledge of Greek was practically non-existent. Eventually I recovered and I vaguely remembered thanking her and leaving her little dwelling for the journey to Athens. But I will never forget her; like others I had met on my travels, she touched my life in a very special way, that old lady.

St. Paul journeyed to many parts of Greece and its islands, although it is not recorded that he ever visited the island of Corfu. Today religion lives on in Greece but sadly Evangelical Christians are few and far between here. I entered a tiny Byzantine church on Mouse Island (aptly named because of its shape) off Corfu. There many candles had been lit by visiting tourists, but my attention was drawn to the many young people entering the church to kiss the pictures of the saints that hung on the walls. Superstition and idolatry are probably as widespread today as they were in the days when St. Paul preached on Mars Hill in Athens. (Acts 17v22-34) Added to this is the fact that many Greeks have become disenchanted with the traditional Greek Orthodox Church, embracing instead erroneous cults which deny fundamental Christian doctrines such as the trinity.

The green island of Corfu is just 583 square kilometres in area, but has a population of around 116,000. How these beautiful islands and the mainland of Greece need to be reached with gospel! From the Ionian Islands to the large island of Crete, many souls have never heard of their need of salvation. And there are tiny remote islands which have probably never even been reached at all. From the busy, bustling and cosmopolitan city of Athens to the smallest medieval village in the mountainous area of a Greek island, they need to hear the message of salvation. Yes, “the harvest truly is plenteous, but the labourers are few”… “Pray ye therefore the Lord of the harvest, that he will send forth labourers into his harvest…” (Matthew 9v37&38)