Posts Tagged ‘trees’

Of Trees: A Bible Wordsearch distributed to Coincide with “National Tree Week” in Ireland

March 10, 2017

I have distributed a little leaflet (adopted from something I had written previously) this past week, using the above occasion to somehow awaken interest in spiritual matters. I believe that very few people read the Bible at all in some areas and, sadly, children are not brought up to know the characters of the Bible who were so familiar to me as a child. May the Lord bless these seasonal leaflets to those who read them!

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ACACIA ALMOND  APPLE  ASH  ASHUR  BALM  BDELLIUM  BAY  BOX  BRANCH  LEAF  CEDAR  CHESTNUT  CINNAMON  CYPRESS  DATE  EBONY  ELM  FIG  FIR  FOREST  GRAFT HAZEL  JUNIPER  MULBERRY  NUTS  OAK  OLIVE  PALM  PINE  SYCAMORE.

One tree listed here is not in the grid. Which one is it? Who climbed into this tree and why did he do it?

There are numerous references to trees (and indeed different species of trees) mentioned in the Bible but perhaps some of the most spiritually significant are those trees which are mentioned in parables and in the first and last books of the Bible – Genesis and Revelation.

How sad that mankind ate of “the tree of the knowledge of good and evil,” but how marvellous that God has sent His only begotten Son, the Lord Jesus Christ to save ‘to the uttermost’ those who trust in His finished work upon the cross of Calvary.

Trees have existed since those early days of creation and if ancient trees could talk, what stories they would tell us! They have been used as weapons, turned into paper, regrettably carved into articles of worship; used to make an ark of ‘gopher wood’ and the ark of the covenant; in the day of the battle of David and Absalom “the wood devoured more people than the sword;” they are a source of paper for the printed word, and once so long ago a large piece of wood was carried to a place which is called in the Hebrew “Golgotha.”

The Lord Jesus Christ suffered, died and rose again that we might have right to the tree of life.

 

“Blessed are they that do his commandments, that they might have right to the tree of life, and may enter in through the gates of the city.” (Rev. 22v14)

Only in His strength can we “do His commandments,” so that we may be likened to the “man that walketh not in the counsel of the ungodly, nor standeth in the way of sinners, nor sitteth in the seat of the scornful. And he shall be like a tree planted by the river of water, that bringeth forth his fruit in his season; his leaf also shall not wither; and whatsoever he doeth shall prosper.” (Psalm 1 – 3)

Our leaves shall never wither while we are walking in the perfect light of the Son.

“For whosoever shall call upon the name of the Lord shall be saved.” (Romans 10v13)

 

The Tree Killer by G.G. Johnston – A Story from “The Two Roads”

July 14, 2015

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I was thinking of the following story just recently as we walked around Ardgillan Castle which is situated overlooking the sea between Balbriggan and Skerries in north County Dublin. On the afternoon of our visit to this beautiful place the scent of roses perfumed the air after a recent shower of rain. A long while ago, when I first came to live in this area, I wrote a little verse about the lovely Ardgillan, from which the Mourne mountains are clearly visible across the sea…

Ardgillan

 Imposing, yet familiar friend,

Beyond your ancient walls

Grey sky and blue sea blend.

And far across the foaming tide

My own dear Mournes peak quietly,

Where Northern lights abide.

 Elizabeth Burke

 In the grounds of Ardgillan there is also a rich variety of plant life and numerous trees, bringing to mind the story of “The Tree Killer” by G.G. Johnston…

“This peculiar form of plant life is a parasite, found in Venezuela and other tropical countries. Seeds carried by the wind, or by birds, fall into crevices in the bark of a giant ceiba, or other tree of the forest, and, moistened by the frequent rains, soon sprout. Slender roots quickly penetrate the bark and feed the plant from the sap within, while other tendrils, like cords, stretch themselves earthwards, sometimes many feet, until able to take root in the fertile soils beneath.

Other arms of this parasite creep up and down the trunk and branches, extending themselves, as if in loving embrace around the tree, but really sucking the life out of its victim, through the roots which grow from it at intervals of only a few inches, penetrating the bark of the tree.

Passing by one of these old giants covered with the tree-killer parasite, one is struck to note its excessive verdure, only to see upon closer observation that this is not the verdure of the tree, but of the parasite. Gradually the life of the noble ceiba is spent, and it stands dead and worthless. The parasite continues to feed upon the rotting form, becoming more distended and verdant. At length, a tropical windstorm hurls its fury against the mass and brings it down, a tangled, worthless pile of vines and leaves.

The story of the destruction of the great ceiba tree is also the story of man. Made in the image of God, he is head of all earth’s creatures. But sin laid hold of him, and, without exception, all have sinned. All in the human family are born with a sinful nature, and all, to some degree, have practiced sin.

The workings of sin are soon manifest in the child, increasing in their manifestations as the child grows. The occasional lie, the deceitful action, the tendency to steal, and the swear-words manifest the evil that is already sown in the heart. It grows with the years, as does the tree parasite, until in many cases the victim is brought down in disgrace, powerless to resist the onslaught of vice and sin.

In other cases, outside influence and inward pride preserve from open disgrace, but the evidences of sin’s presence are, nevertheless, not lacking.

The only hope for the beautiful tree of the forest is in some deliverer, who might come and destroy the tree-killer parasite. The sinner’s hope is not in himself, but in Another. One has come to destroy the power of sin, and deliver the soul of man. The Son of God, born of Israel’s virgin, Mary, in human form, but without the taint of sin, has lived, has died, and has risen again. His sinless life proved His fitness; in His death He suffered God’s judgement for sin, not His, but ours. His dying words were, “It is finished.” He rose in triumph, and went back to glory. The gospel is preached; men believe its message, and immediately experience a new power in their lives. The debt of sin is cancelled: its burden is gone. All fear of coming judgement is over.

My friend, do you not acknowledge before God that you are a sinner? You need a Saviour. Have you received Christ, and have you been saved by His grace? If not, open your heart this moment and accept Him as yours. “The wages of sin is death, but the gift of God is eternal life, through Jesus Christ our Lord.” (Romans 6v23)

If Trees could talk… A Walk in Balrath Woods

June 1, 2013

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On the return journey from Navan, County Meath recently we stopped for a short time at Balrath Woods, a beautiful spot throughout the seasons. Known locally as ‘Knockcomra,’ oak, beech, ash and spruce grow in these mixed woodlands, while lovely wildflowers carpet the depths of the woods. One tree in particular caught my eye – ‘the great beech.’ I don’t know how old this one is but my guess is that it has probably seen several centuries. How amazing to think that some trees, like the oak, can live for more than a thousand years! As a child I used to think how fascinating it would be if an ancient tree had eyes to see, ears to hear conversations – and a tongue to describe the people who had walked past it over the centuries. Fashion, language and terminologies, manners, customs, technology and life as a whole have changed dramatically over the centuries but some things never change…

The natural man’s need for salvation never changes; Jesus Christ is “the same yesterday, and to day and for ever” – and the “Word of our God shall stand for ever.” (Hebrews 13v8, Isaiah 40v8)

“Heaven and earth shall pass away; but my words shall not pass away,” Jesus tells us in Mark 13v31.

Very high up in the beech tree I saw a name deeply carved into the bark and I wondered how long ago this was carved and whether the person who carved it was still alive today.

Surely we make our marks upon the earth – for good or for evil. We will never walk this short journey of life without leaving some sort of impression on the other lives we touch.

As I listened to the chorus of birdsong in this lovely unspoilt place, I thought on the beauty of the Lord’s creation and could only imagine the wonders of the Garden of Eden before the fall of mankind.

I looked beyond the trees where soft fluffy clouds were gathering in the blue sky.

Are you ready today, to meet the Lord, should He break through the clouds, to take those who belong to Him home to glory?

“Then shall the trees of the wood sing out at the presence of the Lord, because he cometh to judge the earth.” (1 Chronicles 16v33)

There are numerous references to trees (and indeed different species of trees) mentioned in the Bible but perhaps some of the most spiritually significant are those trees which are mentioned in parables and in the first and last books of the Bible – Genesis and Revelation.

How sad that mankind ate of “the tree of the knowledge of good and evil,” but how marvellous that God has sent His only begotten Son, the Lord Jesus Christ to save ‘to the uttermost’ those who trust in His finished work upon the cross of Calvary.

Trees have existed since those early days of creation and if ancient trees could talk, what stories they would tell us! They have been used as weapons, turned into paper, regrettably carved into articles of worship; used to make an ark of ‘gopher wood’ and the ark of the covenant; in the day of the battle of David and Absalom “the wood devoured more people than the sword;” they are a source of paper for the printed word, and once so long ago a large piece of wood was carried to a place which is called in the Hebrew “Golgotha.”

The Lord Jesus Christ suffered, died and rose again that we might have right to the tree of life.

“Blessed are they that do his commandments, that they might have right to the tree of life, and may enter in through the gates of the city.” (Rev. 22v14)

Only in His strength can we “do His commandments,” so that we may be likened to the “man that walketh not in the counsel of the ungodly, nor standeth in the way of sinners, nor sitteth in the seat of the scornful. And he shall be like a tree planted by the river of water, that bringeth forth his fruit in his season; his leaf also shall not wither; and whatsoever he doeth shall prosper.” (Psalm 1 – 3)

Surely, our leaves shall never wither while we are walking in the perfect light of the Son.

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