Posts Tagged ‘world poetry day’

Twilight Memories

March 21, 2020

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Today being World Poetry Day and tomorrow, Sunday 22nd March, being Mother’s Day in many countries including Ireland, I am in a reflective mood. I will miss my mother tomorrow because she has gone Home to be with the Lord – and I will miss at least one of my daughters who is abroad in Northern Italy. I will also miss having contact with other loved ones on account of this present Coronavirus situation and the need for “social distancing.” My memories float back, at this time, to the days of my childhood and how I would run out into the fields to gather primroses for my Mum. “Elizabeth always brings me the first primrose,” she would say and I smile at that memory. Life was simpler then, those days were not as commercialised as they are now – and we had never known “a worldwide pandemic.”
Yet, though all may change, “Jesus is the same yesterday, today and forever,” open and always ready to listen to our every anguished prayer. For those of you who love and miss loved ones – who may be distant in more ways than one, I dedicate “Twilight Memories” to you.

Twilight Memories
Whispering leaves and a blackbird’s song
Warm my heart as I stroll along;
Thrush and swallow, blue tit and wren,
Wagtail and warbler, a lark in the glen.

The farmyard lies as silent as stone,
Weeds in the walls, the garden o’ergrown.
Clouds drift by in a timeless sky,
As I dream and ponder on days gone by.

Soon the darkness will cloak the land
And birds refrain from their chorus grand.
Another day over, the dark night begun;
The moon drifts through clouds instead of the sun.

I remember a farmyard one time;
An old house painted with whitewash and lime.
Children’s voices at play in the twilight hour,
The grass smelling sweet from a summer shower.

I smile at the memory as I walk in the lane,
But my thoughts wander back to a time of pain.
Tomorrow may come and tomorrow may go,
But oh how our lives have changed ever so!

Lord, touch those I pray for with infinite love,
That they would know thy joy from above.
Darkness has fallen; in the silence I weep,
But my Lord never slumbers and nor doth He sleep.

© Elizabeth Burke
“I will lift up mine eyes unto the hills, from whence cometh my help. My help cometh from the Lord, which made heaven and earth. He will not suffer thy foot to be moved: he that keepeth thee will not slumber. Behold, he that keepeth Israel shall neither slumber nor sleep. The Lord is thy keeper: the Lord is thy shade upon thy right hand. The sun shall not smite thee by day, nor the moon by night. The Lord shall preserve thee from all evil; he shall preserve thy soul. The Lord shall preserve thy going out and thy coming in from this time forth, and even for evermore.” (Psalm 121)
“The eyes of the Lord are upon the righteous, and his ears are open unto their cry.” (Psalm 34v15… also 17)

Thoughts on World Poetry Day

March 21, 2017

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Perhaps the most beautiful poetry of all is contained throughout the books of the Bible. Even Poet Laureate, Alfred, Lord Tennyson described the Book of Job as one of the “greatest poems of ancient and modern times.”

Job, devastated by the loss of livestock and then tragically bereaved of loved ones and robbed of his own health, seeks to understand this in the light of his standing as a righteous servant of the Lord.

I (and many other Christians I am certain) thank God today for the Book of Job which stands as a bastion of truth in an era when “health, wealth and prosperity” are seen as proof of Godliness.

Sadly, those who think this way live only for the things of this life, while the standard for the Christian is to “look not at the things which are seen, but at the things which are not seen: for the things which are seen are temporal; but the things which are not seen are eternal.” (2Corinthians 4v18)

Today, on World Poetry Day, I think on the elements “which are eternal.” Perhaps the most essential poetry of all is that which challenges mankind to think on the eternal… on that which will never die.

Like Job, I have this sure hope: “For I know that my Redeemer liveth, and that he shall stand at the latter day upon the earth. And though after my skin worms destroy this body, yet in my flesh shall I see God:” (Job 19v25&26)

Today, in the knowledge that the soul is that which shall never die, I exhort others to think on the value of the soul. (“For what shall it profit a man, if he shall gain the whole world, and lose his own soul? Or what shall a man give in exchange for his soul? Mark 8v36&37) With this in mind I have contacted Christians with my poem “The Graves,” written quite a few years ago now.

Like Job, many Christian poets and hymn writers often write best in the face of adversity, persecution and tragedy. Job said: “Oh that my words were now written! Oh that they were printed in a book! That they were graven in an iron pen and lead in the rock for ever!”

Job’s anguished cry was indeed answered… for his words were printed in “the word of God, which liveth and abideth for ever.” (1Peter 1v23) And those words live on to comfort those who still walk the sometimes thorny path of this life. His eloquence in the face of adversity has now been rewarded, as Job rejoices with other brothers and sisters in eternity, who by faith chose “rather to suffer affliction with the people of God, than to enjoy the pleasures of sin for a season.” (Hebrews 11v25)

Link to “The Graves” poem: https://readywriterpublications.wordpress.com/tag/the-graves-poem/